“In biology material is expensive but shape is cheap. As of today the opposite was true in the case of technology.” Julian Vincent

Due to economical necessity, architecture of the 20th century mainly consists of the repetition of similar parts. As a result of serial fabrication, architectural design and its construction logics are based on regular systems of order, like the grid, for example. Today, novel and computational fabrication techniques enable a wider range of geometric variety that can emerge into a constructive whole. Those processes allow rethinking the basic relationships between form, performance and fabrication.

Natural systems receive a main portion of their functional performance and adaption from their specific gestalt – their ability for morphologic differentiation. The goal for the first phase of the studio will be to explore and examine biological systems which show certain enhanced performance resulting from their morphological differentiation. The discovered constructive, morphological principles will serve as a basis for the development of construction and material system which can be produced using the 6-axis fabrication robot of the Architecture Faculty. During the second phase, designed systems should be improved and modified aiming towards a research pavilion for the university campus.

A physical real scale prototype of a research pavilion for the university campus is intended.